Gw: New Releases October 28th “Pricing & Links”

Two new Challengers aspire to topple Shadespire!

via Games Workshop

Gundabad Orc Warband $65

Brutal soldiers whose reserves of strength and resilience seem without limit, the Gundabad Orc Spearmen are hated foes of the Dwarves who have spent many years and lives waging war against them. The Gundabad Orc Swordsmen are bloody-minded and powerful fighters.

Field a warband of Gundabad Orcs with this collection of 12 resin miniatures – in it, you’ll find:
– 6 Gundabad Orc Spearmen
– 6 Gundabad Orc Swordsmen

This set comes supplied with 12 Citadel 25mm Round bases. Rules are available in The Hobbit: Motion Picture Trilogy™ There and Back Again.

 

Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire – Sepulchral Guard $30

Introduce a new and unique warband to your games of Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire and take advantage of new and different ways to play – whatever warband you use – with this set of miniatures and cards. It includes 7 Skeleton miniatures and a deck of 60 cards, 30 of which are universal, to be used by any and every warband – add these cards to your arsenal and build your perfect deck.

Content:

– 7 Easy To Build, bone-coloured plastic Skeleton miniatures: 3 Petitioners, The Champion, The Harvester, The Prince of Dust and The Sepulchral Warden;
– 60 unique cards for use in games of Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire, broken down as follows:
– 9 objective cards for the Sepulchral Guard;
– 10 upgrade cards for the Sepulchral Guard;
– 10 ploys for the Sepulchral Guard;
– 11 universal objectives, for use with any Warhammer Underworlds warband;
– 10 universal upgrades, for use with any Warhammer Underworlds warband;
– 10 universal ploys, for use with any Warhammer Underworlds warband.

 

Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire – Ironskull’s Boyz $30

Introduce a new and unique warband to your games of Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire and take advantage of new and different ways to play – whatever warband you use – with this set of miniatures and cards. It includes 4 Orruk miniatures and a deck of 60 cards, 30 of which are universal, to be used by any and every warband – add these cards to your arsenal and build your perfect deck.

Included:

– 4 Easy To Build, green-coloured plastic Orruk miniatures: Basha, Hakka, Bonekutta and Gurzag Ironskull;
– 60 unique cards for use in games of Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire, broken down as follows:
– 9 objective cards for Ironskull’s Boyz;
– 10 upgrade cards for Ironskull’s Boyz;
– 10 ploys for Ironskull’s Boyz;
– 11 universal objectives, for use with any Warhammer Underworlds warband;
– 10 universal upgrades, for use with any Warhammer Underworlds warband;
– 10 universal ploys, for use with any Warhammer Underworlds warband.

 

Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire – Ironjawz Dice Pack $10

This is a set of Ironjawz-themed dice for use with Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire. It contains 8 six-sided dice – 5 green Attack dice and 3 grey Defense dice, with the apppropriate symbols on each. Pick up a set for spares – you can never have too many!

Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire – Deathrattle Dice Pack $10

This is a set of Sepulchral Guard-themed dice for use with Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire. It contains 8 six-sided dice – 5 purple Attack dice and 3 grey Defense dice, with the apppropriate symbols on each. Pick up a set for spares – you can never have too many!

Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire – Khorne Bloodbound Dice Pack $10

This is a set of Khorne Bloodbound-themed dice for use with Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire. It contains 8 six-sided dice – 5 red Attack dice and 3 grey Defense dice, with the apppropriate symbols on each. Pick up a set for spares – you can never have too many!

Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire – Stormcast Eternals Dice Pack $10

This is a set of Stormcast Eternals-themed dice for use with Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire. It contains 8 six-sided dice – 5 blue Attack dice and 3 grey Defense dice, with the apppropriate symbols on each. Pick up a set for spares – you can never have too many!

White Dwarf November 2017 $9

This month we journey into the underhive as Necromunda returns! We give you the complete lowdown on this classic game now returned in a great new edition, with a battle report, painting guides and much, much more. And, of course, it’s not all Necromunda, not by any means.

The Last Hunt (Hardback) $27

A White Scars novel

When one of their recruiting worlds comes under threat from a splinter fleet of Hive Fleet Leviathan, Joghaten Khan leads the 4th Company to protect the planet from the rampaging tyranids. But all is not as it seems…

READ IT BECAUSE
The White Scars get a rare outing in the 41st millennium in a high-octane action novel which sees the Khan’s sons defend their hunting grounds from the might of the hive fleets.

THE STORY
In the grim darkness of the 41st millennium, the Imperium is protected by Space Marines, superhuman warriors who battle tirelessly to protect humanity from aliens and the dark powers of Chaos. The White Scars are an old and noble Chapter, their apparent wildness and savagery hiding a cultured and spiritual nature. When one of their recruiting worlds comes under threat from a splinter fleet of Hive Fleet Leviathan, Joghaten Khan leads the 4th Company to protect the planet from the rampaging tyranids. But all is not as clear as it seems. Though the White Scars find their efforts hampered by mysterious enemies, they also receive an offer of aid from a most unexpected quarter. Without help, their mission looks next to impossible, but are their newfound allies to be trusted?

Written by Robbie MacNiven.

 

The Rise Of Nagash (Paperback) $21

A Warhammer Chronicles omnibus

Nagash, priest king of Khemri, embarks upon a quest for immortality that will spark a war, destroy an empire and unleash a plague of undeath that will blight the world forever.

READ IT BECAUSE
Even gods start somewhere, and the God of Death is no different. Nagash bestrides the Mortal Realms like a colossus, but once he was a humble (well, okay, maybe not humble) priest king who changed the world forever by sheer will… Find out how in these three classic Warhammer novels.

THE STORY
Nagash was the first necromancer and the supreme lord of undeath. He wrested the secrets of dark magic from the elves and perverted them to suit his ends. When the priest-kings of Nehekhara stood united against him, he broke their armies and sacked their cities. He raised the largest army of the dead the world has ever known and became an immortal dark god. His deeds are legend. This is his story.

Written by Mike Lee

 

Cult Of The Warmason (Paperback) $16

A Warhammer 40,000 novel

On the shrine world of Lubentina, one of the holiest planets of the Imperium, dedicated to a hero from the Age of Heresy, civil unrest and rumours of sinister, four-armed monsters spur the Sisters of Battle into action against numberless foes.

READ IT BECAUSE
The Sisters of Battle of the Adepta Sororitas are thrown into action as a devastating alien threat brings warfare to one of the holiest worlds of the Imperium.

THE STORY
In a galaxy teeming with alien aggressors, nothing unites the Imperium more than the worship of the immortal God-Emperor. Without the shining light of his divinity, travel through the stars would not be possible, and humanity would be swallowed by darkness. The shrine world of Lubentina attracts billions of pilgrims who visit to reaffirm their faith, and catch a glimpse of the sacred relic held in its great cathedral. But the reach of man’s enemies is long, and when civil unrest breaks out, and rumours of four-armed monsters abound, the Adepta Sororitas tasked with defending the world must face the fight of their lives. For they are few, but their enemies are numberless.

Written by C L Werner.

 

Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire – Sepulchral Guard Sleeves $8

Protect your precious Warhammer Underworlds cards with this set of sleeves themed to represent the Sepulchral Guard (an expansion for Warhammer Underworlds adding extra Skeleton miniatures and cards. ) This set includes:

– 12 sleeves for your objective cards, with artwork on the reverse;
– 20 sleeves for your power cards, with artwork on the reverse;
– 7 character card sleeves, which are transparent to allow the reverse of the card to be visible.

 

Warhammer Underworlds: Shadespire – Ironskull’s Boyz Sleeves $8

Protect your precious Warhammer Underworlds cards with this set of sleeves themed to represent Ironskull’s Boyz (an expansion for Warhammer Underworlds adding extra Orruk miniatures and cards.) This set includes:

– 12 sleeves for your objective cards, with artwork on the reverse;
– 20 sleeves for your power cards, with artwork on the reverse;
– 4 character card sleeves, which are transparent to allow the reverse of the card to be visible.

 

You get caught up in the Shadespire…

  • benn grimm

    Ah Nagash, how times change. Once the character with arguably some of the best lore and the ugliest model, now a prime example of the silliest lore and one of the nicest models they make. (He’s not a god, he’s just a very naughty boy…)

    • AEZ

      He is a vengeful god in style of the ancient greek gods who also liked personalized (and eternal) punishments. Sisyphus and Tantalos also disagree with you.

      • benn grimm

        Lol. No he isn’t, and no they don’t. Certainly not in the context of the article, where they refer to his AoS incarnation when promoting his Old Worlde adventures. Which is pretty dumb, but there you go, things associated with AoS often are.

        • AEZ

          Ok let’s step back
          1. I agree his old lore is cool
          2. I agree his old model is wonky
          3. I agree his new model is cool

          so.. Why do you think his current lore is silly?

          • benn grimm

            I guess it’s just a taste/feeling thing. I don’t like how a bunch of popular characters were turned into what were supposedly ‘gods’ (or magic winds) in the end times. Nagash always craved god like power, and even killed off a few if memory serves correct, but was vulnerable, and was beaten, (and killed) a few times. The story of how he left humanity behind is a gripping one, full of pain (his, but also lots of others) and adversity.

            The fact that he’s now just basically a facsimile of Hades, who spends his time creating magic mirror bubble worlds and unoriginal punishments, just irks me. His goal was always to separate men from their gods, their spirituality, to break them, to leave them without hope, without sanctuary, without a higher notion of nobility, to kill EVERYBODY and rule over the entire world ( not underworld) that he had turned into a wasteland. Now that’s a terrifying villain, whereas Hades…? Meh.

            But yeah, totally my own opinion/preference, hope I’ve made sense.

          • UnpluggedBeta

            Thanks for voicing a reason for that gnawing displeasure I’ve been feeling in the back of my mind ever since reading AoS Nagash lore; I think you nail it.

          • benn grimm

            No worries, glad it made sense to some one 😉

    • Vicent Martín Bonet

      So your argument is your headcanon? Wow, just for a second I thought you’d actually have a point.

      • benn grimm

        What argument? You seem confused Vicent. And I do have a point, you just don’t really seem to get it. But that’s fine.

        • ZeeLobby

          What scares me is that there are probably people who’ve been introduced to only this incarnation, and have missed the awesomeness that was his old world lore.

          • benn grimm

            It’s a shame isn’t it? Though I think there have been a lot of guys introduced to WFB via the total war series fairly recently who are still hungry for the old lore. Rereleases like this trilogy (and the sigmar one, and the Elves one) help support that. Hopefully we should see Tomb Kings and Nagash pretty soon in total war, the Black Pyramid, Lahmia and Khemri are all on the mortal empires map.

          • ZeeLobby

            Yeah. That would be pretty awesome. I definitely know a bunch of people unfamiliar with the tabletop game that love playing TW2 (and one).

          • benn grimm

            Same. I think it’s been fantastic for reviving interest in WFB, got a game in the other day with my DE against a HE force which was all bought and painted in the last year. My HH play group are up for a WFB mini league as well, which I doubt would’ve happened without good ol Sega and CA.

          • ZeeLobby

            Yeah. My group was always way more into 40K than fantasy. A bunch of people got into it at the beginning of 8th, but we’re turned off by the horde unit sizes (and the purchases necessary) and unit removing spells. It’s too bad too. My one friends skaven army was amazing. Totally converted abominations and more. Most just didn’t like AoS’s rules, but almost all play TW now, haha. Who knows, maybe I can convince them at some point to go back an edition or two. Just hard getting people to play unsupported games unless they were all pretty obsessed with them.

          • benn grimm

            Yeah, 8th had its issues with min maxing, much like all their games, and there were definitely some op armies, but once you move past the doom blocks and crazy magic shenanigans it becomes a lot more fun. Lower points limits are a good answer, but other solutions are available. My personal gripes are mostly with the power of artillery and how they can murder big things (particularly lords on dragons/manticore etc), but tbh I’ve found they aren’t necessarily universally shared. Everyone has their fave ed (mines 4th) but really ill play any.

            Yeah, you’re right, it’s not easy persuading people to play an unsupported game, which is why I don’t bother too much. There are enough people who are into it already (or have been at some point). Anyone who wants to make the effort to get into it now without having to be persuaded is my kind of person and just the kind of guy/gal we need on board.

          • The three things about 8th that made it a garbage game (IMO):

            * steadfast (great idea, poor execution, encouraged a giant mega death star slapping bellies with the opposing mega death star)

            * magic. It was literally all level 4s all the time or go home, and then six-dicing for the win.

            * artillery. Laser guided cannons one shotting epic monsters.

            The best incarnation of WHFB will forever to me be encapsulated from sept 2000 thru mid 2003 and sixth edition, before the B.S power builds started breaking the game again.

          • benn grimm

            All fair criticisms I’ve heard a fair amount, and pretty much agree with on the whole(cept the garbage bit of course). 6th definitely seems to be a popular favourite. I remember enjoying 6th, but the models (elves in particular) weren’t as good back then.

          • I get a little extreme with my words sometimes 😉 8th was fun, but really frustrated me with those pointers. Had I not ever played classic wargames or say 6th edition WHFB I probably wouldn’t have even noticed those things, but those things really rubbed me wrong, especially toward the end.

          • benn grimm

            Ha, yeah you’re not the only one guilty of that 😉

          • ZeeLobby

            Yeah. 6th will always be one of my favorites. I really liked Ravening Hordes too, which is around when I actually started (we played before then but it was pretty much just making pew pew noises on the carpet.

          • Like being only a hand after being killed by some manic Skaven-weaponry armed Human. Loved that, made Nagash seem a lot better to me, being a Skaven player.

          • ZeeLobby

            Man. What an epic story line. So cool.

          • Exactly. Long live Warhammer Fantasy.

          • UnpluggedBeta

            Long live Warhammer Fantasy.

            I’m going to still try and get into AoS, but they’re not making it easy.

  • frankelee

    The orcs look like they’re wearing yellow, old timey pajama overalls.

  • Time to get me some Skelingtons!